Fox and Broom

A mom's adventures in keeping healthy, keeping her sanity, and making stuff.

Archive for the category “Goals”

Paris Part VI: Les Catacombs and Leaving

I am not sure which day this picture was taken. The name made me laugh. Extra Greek. I am guessing it was probably amazing, as it was always full. We ate dinner one night at the place next door, L’Atlas. It was tasty.

This was a Chinese restaurant that we did eat at. It was delicious, but I was still suffering from my anorexia and did not eat my whole meal. The poor waitress was really upset. I told her the meal was so good, but my body was having trouble with eating. I am not sure if she understood me. I felt pretty bad.

Now for the Catacombs.

May 25, 2017: Les Catacombs

Visiting the Catacombs was a learning experience. I underestimated the popularity of the bones placed under the city. I should have purchased advanced tickets. We wound up waiting in line for three hours. Once again, as I have mentioned in a few other posts, purchase advance tickets or “tours” of the tourist sites. The app I liked the most was Viator. Just make sure to plan out what sites you want to see before you leave as you will most likely need to print out the tickets. Most sites do not have a mobile check-in option.

Some flowers in the garden near the Catacomb entrance.

Gabriel wearing his handy dandy tourist vest.

I really like the buildings in Paris. I took a lot of pictures of homes, businesses, and Metro stations.

More flowers. We were by the garden for a very long time.

Pretty kitty. This was about two and a half hours in. We were close to the entrance

Finally. We made it in. There are a lot of stairs, then some tunnels. It was so cool in there. It felt really good after our long wait in the hot sun.

I don’t know why, but this sign made me giggle. It was for a small auditorium, but, to me, it looks like a guy surrounded by bowling balls.

The Catacombs are enormous. They have blocked off a number of other tunnels to keep people from getting lost. People still find other ways into other parts of the Catacombs and get lost. There are also a few levels. This gate is actually blocking a window looking down on a lower level. We walked under this window a little later.

The tunnels were naturally created by high ocean levels. This means that there are fossils in the walls and interesting shells have been found.

Shhh. I might have taken pictures, but I did not use a flash. I also did not pet the skulls.

Now, on to the part everyone is interested in. The bones. A little history:

This ossuary was created as place to deposit the remains of a mass grave in the Saint Innocents cemetery. The grave had started to break down and caused damage to some of the infrastructure around it.
It now houses approximately six million people from a few cemeteries. The remains were not always so organized. The bones were organized in a more visitable way in 1810 when the ossuary was renovated.
Public visits were largely limited to four tours per year. I believe they started to allow daily tours after Paris hosted the World’s Fair in 1900.

One of those closed off tunnels.

This was the only skull with teeth. It was also a slightly different color than the others.

Some of the sights we saw on our way back to our hotel.

This is something that I had also seen in Portugal in 1995. Saving the façade of the building, but putting up a more modern building behind it. I believe it allows the city to retain its classic charm without falling behind the times. Or having people fall through floors that are hundreds of years old.

I love French graffiti. Also, this little stone shack is adorable.

Our final dinner in Paris. My burger was delicious.

Our desserts were works of art. The top is some sort of ice cream with puff pastry deliciousness and the next one is a perfect crème brûlée.

May 26: Leaving Paris

 

Some pictures of the city as our taxi driver took us back to the airport.

At the airport. Even the stores in the airport have beautiful displays.

An airport art gallery.

Last selfie in Paris.

I started tearing up at this point. My Paris adventure was more than I had expected. I didn’t realize I was going to miss it, but I do.

Mount Rainier. We made it back to Seattle. We had also flown over the Tri-Cities. I was on the wrong side of the plane to get a picture of my neighborhood.

Made it home from Seattle.

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Paris Part IV: La Tour Eiffel

If you go to Paris, you almost have to visit the iconic building that is used to symbolize not just the city, but the country of France. For the big tourist attractions, such as The Eiffel Tower, I highly recommend purchasing tour guide tickets well ahead of time. I used Viator to look up events and tickets. With a tour guide for the Eiffel Tower, you get around the crowd and head right on up.

May 23, 2017

We started our day with the most amazing pastries and, of course, caffe. My pastry was a flaky, delicate, almond thing. It just kind of melts in your mouth. I wish I had taken a picture of what it is called. I still fondly think of this pastry. Gabriel had an eclair and something that seemed to be a doughnut cupcake.

Gabriel had injured himself the day before. Which I am sure will surprise anyone who knows him. He is allergic to band aids, so we usually use gauze and medical tape for his wounds. We stopped at the pharmacy on our way to the metro to see about getting tape and gauze. We tried to explain to the cashier what we were looking for and she was very confused. She also seemed slightly offended. In the end, she found an amazing solution for Gabriel. It is a sort of band aid spray called Urgo. It was exactly what he needed. I also figured out why the cashier seemed a little offended. The word “tape” is a little different in French.

Our transit to the Eiffel Tower was a double-decker. I thought this was pretty neat. The seats were very comfortable and it was mostly empty.

We arrived a few hours early for our tour, so we decided to explore a little. We walked across the river and wandered around an area that had some pretty little shady parks and seemed to be the home to foreign embassies. 

I can not express how hard it was for me to get up these stairs. But I did it.

I find Paris graffiti beautiful.

Athena in a park.

We had a snack at the Paris Museum of Modern Art. The outside eating area was beautiful.

This was right next to the Museum of Modern Art. I believe it was part of the Palais de Tokyo.

Chichis. Which are sort of like churros.

Now we are back at the Tower. We are waiting outside for our tour (not realizing the tour starts about two blocks away). While we were waiting, some scammers tried to engage us. We pretended not to understand, but they would not leave us alone. I found out after we walked away (when I realized our meeting spot was elsewhere) that someone had attempted to get into my backpack. I had tied up it pretty good and am glad that I did so.

This is our very kind and sweet guide.

The lifts are almost like a really crowded, slow roller coaster.

When we got to the second level, the guide gave us a brief history on the Tower and explained the different colors the Tower had been. It has been repainted every 7 years. There are discussions going on now about what color the next one will be.

We went around the second level and took a few pictures.

It was incredibly crowded. We went up to the top level and took more pictures. I love the “secret office” of Monsieur Eiffel. The champagne bar was also a fun touch.

The buildings were so small at this height that Paris almost looked like a model of a city.

 

After our visit to la tour Eiffel, we meandered back towards our hotel. If I recall correctly, our trip back was not nearly as comfortable. It was the end of the work day and all the trains and metros were packed. I almost did not get off at our stop; I was crushed against a pole.

We ended the day eating something amazing and I had my new favorite drink.

The Day

I have been working on blogs about my Paris adventure, but I wanted to put up a quick post for today.

A year ago today, I found out that my pain was definitely not caused by a pulled muscle. A year ago today, my life turned upside-down. A year ago today, Dr. C told me that I had metastatic breast cancer that had spread to my bones. Stage IV. No cure. A death sentence.

It isn’t an anniversary that I want to remember. I was in agony and losing weight. I had gotten to the point where I was having trouble walking. I was exhausted. I was angry.

My first thoughts were for my kids. I couldn’t leave them. Not yet. I very much want to see them grow up. I very much want to see what kind of humans they become. I also, maybe selfishly, very much want them all to remember me. Really remember me. Not just hear about me from other family members or friends.

After my diagnosis, I went downhill fast. I honestly thought I wasn’t going to make it to my birthday in October. I believe my children and my anger brought me through that time. The radiation treatments helped with my pain and my hormone treatments helped to get my cancer somewhat under control, but it was my children who got me through the other things. I thought of them as I forced food down my throat. I thought of them as I forced myself to reclaim my muscles and start walking again. I thought of them as the worst of my symptoms started to fade and now, a year later, I am not the skeletal, sickly, creature that cancer wants to make me.

Now, I enjoy eating again. I have been working on taming my garden that went out of control. I walked miles and miles in Paris. I took my oldest son to Disney World and Universal Studios. I walked a 5K, which I didn’t think I would be able to do again. I have hope that I now have years instead of months. I have met a lot of the goals that I set for myself last year at this time. Every time I cross one off, I get a feeling of vindication. Fuck you cancer.

Living with cancer means fighting everyday. I am a warrior.

The Gift

It all started on Christmas. Well, maybe before that. For me, it started on Christmas Eve at my in-laws. We had gone over to celebrate, have dinner, and exchange gifts. I was given a beautiful, small, gold box. The bow was perfect. Bobi really does the most wonderful bows on gifts. I like to use her bows as decorations on my tree. It means I get new decorations every year.

I opened the box and the first thing I see is a small card that says “I love Paris.” I started tearing up. I had an idea as to what might be under that card. It was two small airline tickets. My in-laws had given me their airline mileage to be able to visit Paris with my husband. I ugly cried.

I have wanted to travel to France with Gabriel for forever. I kept trying to save up for this trip, but, well, life happens. Along with the kindness of the tickets, both sets of in-laws made out a schedule for keeping my boys. We ultimately decided to go in May as the June flights were double the mileage cost (and double to triple the hotel costs). We also received a surprise gift of travel money from Gabriel’s coworkers. If any of them are reading this, thank you so very much. The money covered our hotel expenses and allowed us to buy gifts for the boys and enjoy the Parisian food and sights.

I spent five months working on DuoLingo to learn French or at least enough to get by. Turns out that I didn’t use it as much as I really kind of wanted to. I did use it a little and it was fun to be able to communicate a little better. I also understood someone who was talking about my mispronunciation of a place. I butchered Montmartre. I knew it and I practiced saying it while at breakfast. The woman across from us said something in French to her friend that basically translated to, “She needs to learn to speak correctly.” Yes, I know I do. Which I was trying to do. It amused me that I was able to pick up on what she was saying. I guess I had learned more than I thought I had.

I also ordered two months of News In Slow French. I’m actually considering just subscribing to that for a year. Or more. It has a lot more international news than my local news media outlets give me.

My trip was huge and I want to document as much as I can, so I am writing a separate post for each day with lots of pictures. I won’t be able to actually post all of them. I took over 700 pictures. A good number of photos will be in each post.

 

Goals

I have two slightly different sets of goals. “Local goals” and “worldly goals.” The local goals are things that I need to either do to myself or can do in my area. The worldly goals are bigger or more expensive to achieve. In the past three weeks, I hit two local goals and one worldly goal.

I was able to finally walk around my block now that the weather has gotten friendlier. My block is pretty big. It is about the size of three blocks all together. In October, I was barely able to walk to the corner and back. This small feat was a big deal for me. April 2, I walked to the top of Garfield Hill. Garfield Hill is a part of the road that goes from 19th (at the base) to 27th (at the top), so it is a decent few blocks to walk. Especially if you are walking up a 17% grade.

Garfield Hill

The view from the top is really nice. I always forget how pretty it is up here. On a really nice day, you can see mountains in that direction.

The view from the top of Garfield Hill.

I had a lot of trouble trying to get a good picture of just what this hill looks like. It is daunting no matter if you are at the top of it or at the bottom. My kids always do the roller coaster “wheeeeeee” when we drive down it. I didn’t drive up or down it at all while we had snow and ice.

Garfield Hill from the top.

Garfield Hill from the bottom.

My walk ended with me looking goofy while admiring this willow tree’s flowers. They were so lovely.


The Worldly Goal that I hit was seeing the Pacific. I hiked so much that I could probably say that I hiked Badger Mountain, but I want to actually do that before I cross it out. It was a pretty amazing trip and I will be forever thankful to Abigail for setting it up. We saw a ton of sea lions, a mama gray whale and her calf, weird tentacles on the beach, sunset over the ocean, and a few really neat geological formations.

My first view of the Pacific. We were still driving to our cabin.

It was misty like this for almost our entire drive to the Oregon coast.

The Shelley Cabin. Our little home for a few days. It has a path down to the beach.

We had an amazing, sunny day. We took the Hobbit Trail to the beach.

There were a few of the tentacle-like things on the beach. I suspect they are actually some form of sea weed.

Picture from a viewpoint. This is the same viewpoint from which we saw hundreds of sea lions and a gray whale with her baby.

Hundreds of sea lions.

A couple of sunset pictures. That day was so beautiful and perfect.

These are pictures taken from our private beach access.

Sunset.

Sea lions inside of the Sea Lion Caves.

A view from inside of the Sea Lion Caves.

My final picture of the Pacific before we drove away from the cabin.

We stayed in a lovely little cabin between Yachats, OR and Florence, OR. If you ever need to rent a cabin in this area, I highly recommend searching for The Shelley Cabin. The Pacific was everything I thought it would be and more. It is definitely more powerful than the gentler (sort of) Atlantic where I grew up in Florida. It was very chilly out, so I did not even try to dip a toe into the water. I just can’t handle cold the way that I used to. All in all, a wonderful trip.

Oh – on our one sunny day, Abigail made me dress up and we had a photo shoot:

A Last Unicorn theme

Unfortunately, the horn broke.

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